URBANISATION IS A

GLOBAL PHENOMENON

WITH REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE

AND LOCAL CONSEQUENCES

The GIPL at Dalhousie University views the landscape as a diverse ecological fabric which connects nature to people. The landscape is multifunctional, providing multiple services through its multiple systems.  This interaction occurs at multiple scales over multiple landscape types.  Green infrastructure supports human quality of life but these benefits depend on the needs, choices and values of people as well as the specific landscape context. It is only through the maintenance of this multi-functionality, by integrating landscape use in the ecological fabric that maintains ecosystem capacities and system interconnectivity, that sustainability can be achieved and we connect processes to people and places.

Green Space Design and Human Behaviour + Emotion

HUMAN WELLBEING and ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY : Space to Place

Green Structures : Maintaining Ecosystem Performance in the Face of Urban Development and Landscape Change

 PERI-URBAN FUTURES : Unlocking Rural-Urban Synergies

GIPL'S WORK ALIGNS WITH FOUR INTERRELATED THEMES:

3

1

2

URBAN FORESTS and URBAN GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Landscape Fragmentation and Human Development : Inter-Linking Ecosystem Services

4

Tackling Climate Change at Coastal Edges : Wetland Parks and Stormwater Sponges

COASTAL RESILIENCE

THE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE PERFORMANCE LAB

  • Tumblr - Resilient Urbanisms
  • Dalhousie Landscape Arch Facebook
  • Recalibrating the Landscape
  • Google Maps

The Green Infrastructure Performance Laboratory

Director, Richard leBrasseur, PhD

r.lebrasseur@dal.ca

Dalhousie University

Department of Plant, Food, and Environmental Sciences

20 Rock Garden Road, EE Building, Room 223

Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada  B2N 5E3